Year 12

VCE | General Excellence – Course Selection Guidelines Year 12

VCE is generally a two year certificate. At Rowville Secondary College, if you are studying for your VCE, the following conditions apply over the two years of the certificate.

  • In Year 11 you will undertake six (6) Units in Semester 1 and six (6) Units in Semester 2 making a total of twelve (12) units across the year.
  • In Year 11, you must undertake at least two (2) Units from the English group (English; EAL; Literature; or English Language).
  • In Year 12 you will undertake five (5) Unit 3 and 4 sequences making a total of ten (10) units.
  • In Year 12 one of the sequences of units MUST be from the English group (English; EAL; Literature; or English Language).

Important Information related to VCE

To successfully complete the VCE you must meet the following criteria:

Satisfactorily complete at least 16 units which must include:

  • Three(3) units of an English subject from the English Group (English, English Language, Literature and EAL) including the satisfactory completion of the Unit 3 and 4 sequence.
  • At least three (3) sequences of Units 3 & 4 studies in addition to the Unit 3 & 4 sequence from the English group, which may include any number of English sequences once the English requirement has been met.

VCE Subjects Offered 

At Rowville SC, we offer a very wide range of VCE subjects. Generally speaking, students in Year 11 select from Unit 1 & 2 subjects and students in Year 12 select from Unit 3 & 4 subjects. The determination of which subjects actually run each year is based on student selection. We cannot guarantee that all subjects will attract enough students to make them viable. Allocation of campus is based predominantly on student choices. Therefore it cannot be guaranteed that subjects will be available at both campuses – it may be necessary for students to undertake cross-campus travel in order to access some subjects.

VET subject information >> 

Tertiary Enhancement Studies >>

Click below to read:

A Guide to Senior School Acronyms & Terms >>

VCE English & Mathematics Information >>

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  • English Language 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Language variation and social purpose
    In this unit students investigate English language in contemporary Australian social settings, along a continuum of informal and formal registers. Students examine the stylistic features of formal and informal language in both spoken and written modes. Students learn how to describe the interrelationship between words, sentences and text as a means of exploring how texts construct message and meaning. Students consider how texts are influenced by the situational and cultural contexts in which they occur. They learn how language can be indicative of relationships, power structures and purpose through the choice of a particular variety of language, and through the ways in which language varieties are used in processes of inclusion and exclusion.

    Unit 4: Language variation and identity
    In this unit students focus on the role of language in establishing and challenging different identities. Students examine both print and digital texts to consider the ways different identities are constructed. Students explore how our sense of identity evolves in response to situations and experiences and is influenced by how we see ourselves and how others see us. Through our language we express ourselves as individuals and signal our membership of particular groups. Students explore how language can distinguish between ‘us’ and ‘them’, creating solidarity and reinforcing social distance.

  • English 3 & 4

    Unit 3
    In this unit students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts.

    Unit 4
    In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media.

  • English as an Additional Language – EAL 3 & 4

    Unit 3
    In this unit students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts.

    Unit 4
    In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media.

  • Literature 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Form and transformation

    In this unit students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. They consider how the perspectives of those adapting texts may inform or influence the adaptations. Students develop creative responses to texts and their skills in communicating ideas in both written and oral forms.

    Unit 4: Interpreting texts

    In this unit students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.

  • Further Mathematics 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed and passed General Maths Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Unit 3 & 4

    Further Mathematics consists of two areas of study, a compulsory Core area of study to be completed in Unit 3 and an Applications area of study to be completed in Unit 4. The Core comprises ‘Data analysis’ and ‘Recursion and financial modelling’. The Applications comprises two modules to be completed in their entirety, from a selection of four possible modules: ‘Matrices’, ‘Networks and decision mathematics’, ‘Geometry and measurement’ and ‘Graphs and relations’. ‘Data analysis’ comprises 40 per cent of the content to be covered, ‘Recursion and financial modelling’ comprises 20 per cent of the content to be covered, and each selected module comprises 20 per cent of the content to be covered. Assumed knowledge and skills for the Core are contained in the General Mathematics Units 1 and 2 topics: ‘Computation and practical arithmetic’, ‘Investigating and comparing data distributions’, ‘Investigating relationships between two numerical variables’, ‘Linear graphs and modelling’, ‘Linear relations and equations’, and ‘Number patterns and recursion’. For each module there are related topics in General Mathematics Units 1 and 2. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, and graphs. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic, financial and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

  • Mathematical Methods 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed Mathematical Methods Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Units 3 & 4

    Units 3 and 4 consist of the areas of study ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Algebra’ and ‘Probability and statistics’, which must be covered in progression from Unit 3 to Unit 4, with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4. Assumed knowledge and skills for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 are contained in Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2, and will be drawn on, as applicable, in the development of related content from the areas of study, and key knowledge and skills for the outcomes of Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

    For Unit 3 a selection of content would typically include the areas of study ‘Functions and graphs’ and ‘Algebra’, and applications of derivatives and differentiation, and identifying and analysing key features of the functions and their graphs from the ‘Calculus’ area of study. For Unit 4, this selection would typically consist of remaining content from the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Algebra’, and the study of random variables and discrete and continuous probability distributions and the distribution of sample proportions. For Unit 4, the content from the ‘Calculus’ area of study would be likely to include the treatment of anti-differentiation, integration, the relation between integration and the area of regions specified by lines or curves described by the rules of functions, and simple applications of this content. The selection of content from the areas of study should be constructed so that there is a development in the complexity and sophistication of problem types and mathematical processes used (modelling, transformations, graph sketching and equation solving) in application to contexts related to these areas of study. There should be a clear progression of skills and knowledge from Unit 3 to Unit 4 in each area of study.

    In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, graphs, differentiation, anti-differentiation, integration and inference with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

  • Specialist Mathematics 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed Mathematical Methods Unit 1 & 2 and Specialist Maths Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Unit 3 & 4

    Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 consist of the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Vectors’, ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’. The development of course content should highlight mathematical structure, reasoning and applications across a range of modelling contexts with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4. The selection of content for Unit 3 and Unit 4 should be constructed so that there is a balanced and progressive development of knowledge and skills with connections among the areas of study being developed as appropriate across Unit 3 and Unit 4. Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 assumes familiarity with the key knowledge and skills from Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2, the key knowledge and skills from Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 topics ‘Number systems and recursion’ and ‘Geometry in the plane and proof’, and concurrent or previous study of Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4. Together these cover the assumed knowledge and skills for Specialist Mathematics, which are drawn on as applicable in the development of content from the areas of study and key knowledge and skills for the outcomes. In Unit 3 a study of Specialist Mathematics would typically include content from ‘Functions and graphs’ and a selection of material from the ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Vectors’ areas of study. In Unit 4 this selection would typically consist of the remaining content from the ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, and ‘Vectors’ areas of study and the content from the ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’ areas of study. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational, real and complex arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, graphs, differentiation, anti-differentiation and integration and inference with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

  • Accounting 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed and passed Accounting Unit 2 prior.

    Unit 3: Recording and reporting for trading business

    This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting. The perpetual method of stock recording with the First In, First Out (FIFO) method is used.

    Unit 4: Control and analysis of business performance

    This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process. The unit I based on the double entry accounting system and the accrual method of reporting for a single activity trading business using the perpetual inventory recording system.

  • Biology 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed and passed Biology Unit 1 and 2 prior.

    Unit 3: How do cells maintain life?

    In this unit students investigate the workings of the cell from several perspectives. These different perspectives enable consideration of both capabilities and the limitations of living organisms whether animal, plant, fungus or microorganism. Students examine the key molecules and biomechanical pathways involved in cellular processes both within the cell and between cells. At this molecular level students study the human immune system and the interactions between its components to provide immunity to specific antigen. A student investigation related to biological change and/or continuity is undertaken in either Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Unit 3 and Unit 4. The findings of the investigation are presented in a scientific poster format.

    Unit 4: How does life change and respond to challenges over time?

    In this unit students consider the continual change and the challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. They examine change in life forms, investigate the relatedness between species and consider the impact of various change events on a population’s gene pool. Students explore the structural and cognitive trends in the human fossil record and the interrelationships between human biological and cultural evolution. The biological consequences, and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule and applying biotechnologies are explored for both the individual and the species.

  • Business Management 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Managing a business

    In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

    Unit 4: Transforming a business

    Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

  • Chemistry 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed and passed Chemistry Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?

    The global demand for energy and materials is increasing with the growth of world population. In this unit students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies, renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment. Students compare and evaluate different chemical energy resources and investigate the combustion of fuels. They consider the purpose, design and operating of principles of galvanic cells, fuel cells and electrolytic cells and calculate quantities in electrolytic reactions. Students analyse manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their reaction rates and extent. They apply the equilibrium law and Le Chatelier’s principle to predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical processes.

    Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?

    Carbon is the basis of the diverse compounds found in living tissues and in the fuels, foods, medicines and many of the materials we used in everyday life. In this unit students investigate the structural features, bonding, reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds including those found in food.  Students process data from instrumental analyses to confirm or deduce organic structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic chemicals in mixtures. They predict the products of reaction pathways and design pathways to produce particular compounds from given starting materials. Students investigate key food molecules including carbohydrates proteins, lipids and vitamins and use calorimetry to determine the energy released in the combustion of food.

     

  • Dance 3 & 4

    Unit 3:

    This unit focuses on choreography, rehearsal and performance of a solo dance work and involves the execution of a diverse range of body actions and use of performances skills. Students also learn a group dance work created by another choreographer. The dance-making and performance processes involved in choreographing, rehearsing and performing the solo dance work, and learning, rehearsing and performing the learnt group dance work are analysed. This analysis connects each student’s own work as a choreographer to the work of professional choreographers.

    Students develop their understanding of choreographic skills through an analysis of ways that the expressive intentions chosen by choreographers of twentieth and/or twenty-first century solo dance works – these are selected from the prescribed list. Students analyse the dance design and use of movement vocabulary, as well as consider influences on the choreographers’ choice of expressive intention, and production aspects of the dance works.

    Unit 4:

    This unit focuses on choreography, rehearsal and performance of a unified solo dance work. When rehearsing and performing this work students focus on expressive and accurate execution of choreography variations of spatial organisation and demonstration of artistry in performance. Students also document and analyse the dance-making and performance processes involved in choreography, rehearsal and performance of the solo dance work. Students’ understanding of choreographic skills is also developed and refined through an analysis of ways in which the choreographers’ intention can be expressed through the manipulation of different types of group structures. These include unison, canon, contrast, symmetrical and asymmetrical groupings and formations. Students also analyse the use of the elements of spatial organisation- direction, level, eye/body focus and dimension- in a group dance work by twentieth and/or twenty-first century choreographer. Influences on choices made by choreographers in these works are also studied.

     

  • Data Analytics 3 & 4

    Unit 3

    In Unit 3 students apply the problem-solving methodology to identify and extract data through the use of software tools such as database, spreadsheet and data visualisation software to create data visualisations or infographics. Students develop an understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology.

    In Area of Study 1 students respond to teacher-provided solution requirements and designs. Students develop data visualisations and use appropriate software tools to present findings. Appropriate software tools include database, spreadsheet and data visualisation software.  In Area of Study 2 students propose a research question, prepare a project plan, collect and analyse data, and design infographics or dynamic data visualisations. Area of Study 2 forms the first part of the School-assessed Task (SAT) that is completed in Unit 4, Area of Study 1.

    Unit 4

    In Unit 4 students focus on determining the findings of a research question by developing infographics or dynamic data visualisations based on large complex data sets and on the security strategies used by an organisation to protect data and information from threats.

    In Area of Study 1 students apply the problem-solving stages of development and evaluation to develop their preferred design prepared in Unit 3, Area of Study 2, into infographics or dynamic data visualisations, and evaluate the solutions and project plan. Area of Study 1 forms the second part of the School-assessed Task (SAT). In Area of Study 2 students investigate security practices of an organisation. They examine the threats to data and information, evaluate security strategies and recommend improved strategies for protecting data and information.

  • Drama 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $150.00

    Unit 3: Devised non-naturalistic ensemble performance

    This unit focuses on non-naturalistic devised ensemble drama. Students explore non-naturalistic performance styles and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and cultural performance traditions and work collaboratively to devise, develop and present an ensemble performance. Students use and manipulate dramatic elements, conventions, performance and expressive skills, performance styles and stagecraft in non-naturalistic ways to shape and enhance the performance. Students also document and evaluate stages involved in the creation, development and presentation of the ensemble performance.

    Unit 4: Non-naturalistic solo performance

    Students explore non-naturalistic performance styles and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and cultural performance traditions. They develop skill in extracting dramatic potential from a stimulus material and use dramatic elements, conventions, performance styles and expressive skills to develop and present a short solo performance. These skills are further developed as students create a devised solo performance in response to a prescribed structure.

  • Economics 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Australia’s economic prosperity

    The Australian economy is constantly evolving. In this unit students investigate the role of the market in allocating resources and examine the factors that are likely to affect the price of the quantity traded for a range of goods and services. They develop an understanding of the measures of efficiency and how market systems can result in efficient outcomes. Students consider contemporary issues to explain the need for government intervention in markets and why markets might fail to maximise society’s living standards. In this unit students develop an understanding of the macro economy. They investigate the factors that influence the level of aggregate demand and supply in the economy and use models and theories to explain how changes in these variables might influence the achievement of the Australian Government’s domestic macroeconomic goals and affect living standards. Students investigate the importance of international economic relationships in terms of their influence on Australia’s living standards. They analyse how international transactions are recorded, predict how economic events might affect the value of the exchange rate and evaluate the effect of trade liberalisation.

    Unit 4: Managing the economy

    Students develop an understanding of how the Australian Government can alter the composition and level of government outlays and receipts to directly and indirectly influence the level of aggregate demand and the achievement of domestic macroeconomic goals. Area of Study 1 focuses on the role of aggregate demand policies in stabilising the business cycle to achieve the Australian Government’s domestic macroeconomic goals. Students examine the role of the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) with a focus on its responsibility to alter the cost and availability of credit in the economy. Students examine and analyse the effects of the last two Australian Government budgets, and how particular initiatives have helped to stabilise the level of aggregate demand and influenced the achievement of domestic macroeconomic goals. In Area of Study 2 students consider how the Australian Government utilises aggregate supply policies to manage the Australian economy. Students investigate the role of both market-based and interventionist approaches to managing the supply side of the economy. They evaluate these policy responses in terms of their effect on incentives and consider how they increase competition and efficiency in the economy. Students assess the role of microeconomic reform in terms of its effect on economic prosperity and the achievement of the Australian Government’s domestic macroeconomic goals.

  • Food Studies 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $200.00

    Unit 3: Food in a daily life

    This unit investigates the many roles and everyday influences of food. Students explore the science of food – they consider the physiology of eating, the microbiology of digestion and appreciating food. They also investigate the functional properties of food and the changes that occur during food preparation and cooking. Students analyse the scientific rationale behind the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and develop their understanding of diverse nutrient requirements.

    Students also investigate how communities, families and individuals change their eating patterns over time and how our food values and behaviours develop within social environments. Students inquire into the role of food in shaping and expressing identity and connectedness and the ways in which food information can be filtered and manipulated. They investigate behavioural principles that assist in the establishment of lifelong, healthy dietary patterns. The practical component of this unit enables students to understand food science terminology and to apply specific techniques to the production of everyday food that facilitates the establishment of nutritious and sustainable meal patterns.

     Unit 4: Food issues, challenges and futures

    In this unit students examine debates about global and Australian food systems. Students focus on issues related to the environment, ecology, ethics, farming practices, the development and application of technologies, and the challenges of food security, food safety, food wastage, and the use and management of water and land. Students also investigate individual responses to food information and misinformation and the development of food knowledge, skills and habits to empower consumers to make discerning food choices. Students consider how to assess information and draw evidence-based conclusions, and apply this methodology to navigate contemporary food fads, trends and diets. Students’ food production repertoire reflects the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

  • Geography 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Changing the land

    This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Students investigate three major processes that are changing land cover in many regions of the world. Students investigate the distribution and causes of these three processes. At a local scale students investigate land use change using appropriate fieldwork techniques and secondary sources. They investigate the scale of change, the reasons for change and the impacts of change. Students undertake fieldwork and produce a fieldwork report using the structure provided.

    Unit 4: Human population – trends and issues

    In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore the patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the world. Population movements such as voluntary and forced movements over long or short terms add further complexity to population structures and to economic, social, political and environmental conditions.

  • Health and Human Development 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Australia’s health in a globalised world

    This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts. Students begin to explore health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry. Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organization (WHO). They use this knowledge as a background to their analysis and evaluation of variations in the health status of Australians. Area of Study 2 focuses on health promotion and improvements in population health over time. Students look at various public health approaches and the interdependence of different models as they research health improvements and evaluate successful programs. While the emphasis is on the Australian health system, the progression of change in public health approaches should be seen within a global context.

    Unit 4: Health and Human development in a global context

    This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Students use data to investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between and within countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live. Students build their understanding of health in a global context through examining changes in burden of disease over time and studying the key concepts of sustainability and human development. They consider the health implications of increased globalisation and worldwide trends relating to climate change, digital technologies, world trade and the mass movement of people. Area of Study 2 looks at global action to improve health and wellbeing and human development, focusing on the United Nations’ (UN’s) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the work of the World Health Organization (WHO). Students also investigate the role of non-government organisations and Australia’s overseas aid program. Students evaluate the effectiveness of health initiatives and programs in a global context and reflect on their capacity to take action.

  • History (Revolutions) 3 & 4

    Unit 3 & 4:

    In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. Revolution is a dramatically accelerated process whereby the new order attempts to create political and social change and transformation based on a new ideology. Progress in a post-revolutionary society is not guaranteed or inevitable. Post-revolutionary regimes are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of violence, oppression and terror. In these units students develop an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of causes and consequences in the revolutionary narrative. They construct an argument about the past using primary sources as evidence and evaluate the extent to which the revolution brought change to the lives of people. They consider how perspectives of the revolution give an insight into the continuity and change experienced by those who lived through dramatic revolutionary moments. Students evaluate historical interpretations about the causes and consequences of revolution and the effects of change instigated by the new order. In developing a course, teachers select two revolutions to be studied from the following, one for Unit 3 and one for Unit 4:

    • The American Revolution of 1776.
    • The French Revolution of 1789.
    • The Russian Revolution of October 1917.
    • The Chinese Revolution of 1949.

    For the two selected revolutions, both areas of study must be undertaken. Students are expected to demonstrate a progression from Unit 3 to Unit 4 in historical understanding and skills.

     

  • Italian 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed Italian Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Unit 3

    The three outcomes for Unit 3 are, on completion of this unit, the student should be able to express ideas through the production of original texts. Each student should be able to analyse and use information from spoken texts. Finally, the student should be able to exchange information, opinions and experiences.

    Unit 4

    The two outcomes for Unit 4 are, on completion of this unit, the student should be able to analyse and use information from written texts. Each student should also be able to respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture of Italian-speaking communities.

     

  • Legal Studies 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Law- making

    In this unit students develop an understanding of the institutions that determine our laws, and their law-making powers and processes. They undertake an informed evaluation of the effectiveness of law-making bodies and examine the need for the law to keep up to date with changes in society. Students develop an appreciation of the complex nature of law-making by investigating the key features and operation of parliament, and influences on law-making, with a focus on the role of the individual. Central to the investigation of law-making is the role played by the Commonwealth Constitution. Students develop an understanding of the importance of the Constitution in their lives and on society as a whole, and undertake a comparative analysis with another country. They learn of the importance of the role played by the High Court of Australia in interpreting and enforcing the Constitution, and ensuring that parliaments do not act outside their areas of power nor infringe protected rights. Students investigate the nature and importance of courts as law-makers and undertake an evaluation of their effectiveness as law-making bodies. They also investigate the relationships that exist between parliaments and courts. Throughout this unit, students examine relevant cases to support their learning and apply legal principles to these cases.

    Unit 4: Resolution and justice

    Students examine the institutions that adjudicate criminal cases and civil disputes. They also investigate methods of dispute resolution that can be used as an alternative to civil litigation. Students investigate the processes and procedures followed in courtrooms and develop an understanding of the adversary system of trial and the jury system, as well as pre-trial and post-trial procedures that operate in the Victorian legal system. Using the elements of an effective legal system, students consider the extent to which court processes and procedures contribute to the effective operation of the legal system. They also consider reforms or changes that could further improve its effective operation. Throughout this unit, students examine current or recent cases to support their learning, and apply legal principles to these illustrative cases.

  • Media 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $165.00

    Unit 3: Media narratives and pre-production

    In this unit students explore stories that circulate in society through media narratives. They consider the use of media codes and conventions to structure meaning, and how this construction is influenced by the social, cultural, ideological and institutional contexts of production, distribution, consumption and reception. Students assess how audiences from different periods of time and contexts are engaged by, consume and read narratives using appropriate media language. Narratives are defined as the depiction of a chain of events in a cause and effect relationship occurring in physical and/or virtual space and time in non-fictional and fictional media products.

    Students use the pre-production stage of the media production process to design the production of a media product for a specified audience. They investigate a media form that aligns with their interests and intent, developing an understanding of the media codes and conventions appropriate to audience engagement, consumption and reception within the selected media form. They explore and experiment with media technologies to develop skills in their selected media form, reflecting on and documenting their progress. Students undertake pre-production processes appropriate to their selected media form and develop written and visual documentation to support the production and post-production of a media product in Unit 4.

     Unit 4: Media production and issues in media

    In this unit students focus on the production and post-production stages of the media production process, bringing the media production design created in Unit 3 to its realisation. They refine their media production in response to feedback and through personal reflection, documenting the iterations of their production as they work towards completion. Students explore the relationship between the media and audiences, focusing on the opportunities and challenges afforded by current developments in the media industry. They consider the nature of communication between the media and audiences, explore the capacity of the media to be used by governments, institutions and audiences, and analyse the role of the Australian government in regulating the media.

  • Music Investigation 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed Music Performance Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    This course focuses on building and refining performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and prepare a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination. As part of their preparation, students will also present performances of both group and solo music works using one or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. Through analyses of other performers’ interpretations and feedback on their own performances, students refine their interpretations and optimise their approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

  • Philosophy 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Minds, bodies and persons

    This unit considers basic questions regarding the mind and the self through two key questions: Are human beings more than their bodies? Is there a basis for the belief that an individual remains the same person over time? Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments put forward in set texts from the history of philosophy to their own views on these questions and to contemporary debates. It is important for students to understand that arguments make a claim supported by reasons and reasoning, whereas a viewpoint makes a claim without necessarily supporting it with reasons or reasoning. Philosophical debates encompass philosophical questions and associated viewpoints and arguments within other spheres of discourse such as religion, psychology, sociology and politics.

    Unit 4: The good life

    In this unit, students explore texts by both ancient and modern philosophers that have had a significant impact on contemporary western ideas about the good life. Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments in set texts from both ancient and modern periods to their own views on how we should live, and use their understandings to inform their analysis of contemporary debates. It is important for students to understand that arguments make a claim supported by reasons and reasoning, whereas a viewpoint makes a claim without necessarily supporting it with reasons or reasoning. Philosophical debates encompass philosophical questions and associated viewpoints and arguments within other spheres of discourse such as religion, psychology, sociology and politics.

  • Physical Education 3 & 4

    Unit 3: Movement skills and energy for physical activity

    This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport. Students investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems to performance in physical activity, sport and exercise. In particular, they investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity. Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery.

    Unit 4: Training to improve performance

    In this unit students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program. Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual, and evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective.

  • Physics 3 & 4

    It is highly recommended that students intending to undertake this subject in Unit 3 & 4, should have successfully completed and passed Physics Unit 1 & 2 prior.

    Unit 3: How do fields explain motion and electricity?

    In this unit, students explore the importance of energy in explaining and describing the physical world. They examine the production of electricity and its delivery to homes. Students consider the field model as a construct that has enabled an understanding of why objects move when they are not apparently in contact with other objects. They explore the interactions, effects and applications of gravitational, electric and magnetic fields including the design and operation of particle accelerators. Students use Newton’s laws and Einstein’s theories to investigate and describe motion.

     Unit 4: How can two contradictory models explain both light and matter?

    In this unit, students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. They examine how the concept of the wave is used to explain the nature of light and analyse its limitations in describing light behaviour. Students further investigate light by using a particle model to explain its behaviour. A wave model is also used to explain the behaviour of matter which enables students to consider the relationship between light and matter. Students are challenged to think beyond the concepts experienced in everyday life to study the physical world from a new perspective.

  • Product Design and Technology (Textiles) 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $130.00

    Unit 3: Applying the product design process

    In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that addresses a personal, local, or global problem (such as humanitarian issues), or that meets the needs and wants of a potential end-user/s. The product is developed through a design process and is influenced by a range of factors including the purpose, function and context of the product; user-centred design; innovation and creativity; design elements and principles; sustainability concerns; economic limitations; legal responsibilities; material characteristics and properties; and technology. Design and product development and manufacture occur in a range of settings. An industrial setting provides a marked contrast to that of a one-off situation in a small cottage industry or a school setting. Although a product design process may vary in complexity or order, it is central to all of these situations regardless of the scale or context. This unit examines different settings and takes students through the product design process as they design for an end-user/s. Students identify methods which could be used in a low-volume or mass/high-volume production setting to manufacture a similar product to their design. In the initial stage of the product design process a design brief is prepared, outlining the context or situation around the design problem and describing the needs and requirements in the form of constraints or considerations. In Area of Study 1, students examine how a design brief addresses particular product design factors and how evaluation criteria are developed from the constraints and considerations in the brief. They develop an understanding of techniques in using the design brief as a springboard to direct research and design activities. In Area of Study 2, students examine how a range of factors, including new and emerging digital technologies, influence the design and development of products within industrial manufacturing settings. They consider issues associated with obsolescence and sustainability models.

    In Area of Study 3, students commence the application of the product design process for a product design for an end-user/s, including writing an individual design brief and criteria that will be used to evaluate the product in Unit 4

    Unit 4: Product development and evaluation

    In this unit students engage with an end-user/s to gain feedback throughout the process of production. Students make comparisons between similar products to help evaluate the success of a product in relation to a range of product design factors. The environmental, economic and social impact of products throughout their life cycle can be analysed and evaluated with reference to the product design factors. In Area of Study 1, students use comparative analysis and evaluation methods to make judgments about commercial product design and development. In Area of Study 2, students continue to develop and safely manufacture the product designed in Unit 3, Outcome 3, using materials, tools, equipment and machines, and record and monitor the production processes and modifications to the production plan and product. In Area of Study 3, students evaluate the quality of their product with reference to criteria and end-user/s’ feedback. Students make judgements about possible improvements. They produce relevant user instructions or care labels that highlight the product’s features for an end-user/s.

  • Product Design and Technology (Wood) 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $165.00

    Unit 3: Applying the product design process

    In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that addresses a personal, local, or global problem (such as humanitarian issues), or that meets the needs and wants of a potential end-user/s. The product is developed through a design process and is influenced by a range of factors including the purpose, function and context of the product; user-centred design; innovation and creativity; design elements and principles; sustainability concerns; economic limitations; legal responsibilities; material characteristics and properties; and technology. Design and product development and manufacture occur in a range of settings. An industrial setting provides a marked contrast to that of a one-off situation in a small cottage industry or a school setting. Although a product design process may vary in complexity or order, it is central to all of these situations regardless of the scale or context. This unit examines different settings and takes students through the product design process as they design for an end-user/s. Students identify methods which could be used in a low-volume or mass/high-volume production setting to manufacture a similar product to their design. In the initial stage of the product design process a design brief is prepared, outlining the context or situation around the design problem and describing the needs and requirements in the form of constraints or considerations. In Area of Study 1, students examine how a design brief addresses particular product design factors and how evaluation criteria are developed from the constraints and considerations in the brief. They develop an understanding of techniques in using the design brief as a springboard to direct research and design activities. In Area of Study 2, students examine how a range of factors, including new and emerging digital technologies, influence the design and development of products within industrial manufacturing settings. They consider issues associated with obsolescence and sustainability models.

    In Area of Study 3, students commence the application of the product design process for a product design for an end-user/s, including writing an individual design brief and criteria that will be used to evaluate the product in Unit 4

    Unit 4: Product development and evaluation

    In this unit students engage with an end-user/s to gain feedback throughout the process of production. Students make comparisons between similar products to help evaluate the success of a product in relation to a range of product design factors. The environmental, economic and social impact of products throughout their life cycle can be analysed and evaluated with reference to the product design factors. In Area of Study 1, students use comparative analysis and evaluation methods to make judgements about commercial product design and development. In Area of Study 2, students continue to develop and safely manufacture the product designed in Unit 3, Outcome 3, using materials, tools, equipment and machines, and record and monitor the production processes and modifications to the production plan and product. In Area of Study 3, students evaluate the quality of their product with reference to criteria and end-user/s’ feedback. Students make judgements about possible improvements. They produce relevant user instructions or care labels that highlight the product’s features for an end-user/s.

     

  • Psychology 3 & 4

    Unit 3: How does experience affect behaviour and mental processes?

    The nervous system influences behaviour and the way people experience the world. In this unit students examine the functioning of the nervous system to explain how a person can interact with the world around them. They explore how stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress. Students investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed behaviours. They consider the limitations and fallibility of memory and how memory can be improved.

    Unit 4: How is wellbeing developed and maintained?

    Consciousness and mental health are two of many psychological constructs that can be explored by studying the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this unit, students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning. Students explore the concept of a mental health continuum and apply a biopsychosocial approach to analyse mental health and disorder. They use specific phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors.

  • Studio Arts 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $165.00

    Unit 3: Studio practices and processes

    In this unit students focus on the implementation of an individual studio process leading to the production of a range of potential directions. Students develop and use an exploration proposal to define an area of creative exploration. They plan and apply a studio process to explore and develop their individual ideas. For this study, the exploration proposal supports the student to identify a direction for their studio process. This process records trialling, experimenting, analysing and evaluating the extent to which art practices successfully communicate ideas presented in the exploration proposal. Students will select some of these potential directions from which to develop at least two artworks in Unit 4. The study of artists and their work practices and processes may provide inspiration for students’ own approaches to art making. Students investigate and analyse the response of artists to a wide range of source material and examine their use of materials and techniques.

    Unit 4: Studio practice and art industry contexts

    In this unit students focus on the planning, production and evaluation required to develop, refine and present artworks that link cohesively according to the ideas resolved in Unit 3. To support the creation of artworks, students present visual and written evaluation that explains why they selected a range of potential directions from Unit 3 to produce at least two finished artworks in Unit 4. Once the artworks have been made, students provide an evaluation about the cohesive relationship between the artworks. This unit also investigates aspects of artists’ involvement in the art industry, focusing on a least two different exhibitions, that the student has visited in the current year of study with reference to specific artworks in those exhibitions. Students investigate the methods and considerations of the artist and/or curator involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks displayed in exhibitions in at least two different galleries or exhibitions.

  • Visual Communication Design 3 & 4 | Curriculum Contribution $165.00

    Unit 3: Visual communication design practices

    In this unit students gain an understanding of the process designers employ to structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media and materials, and the application of design elements and design principles, can create effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. They investigate and experiment with the use of manual and digital methods, media and materials to make informed decisions when selecting suitable approaches for the development of their own design ideas and concepts. Students use their research and analysis of the process of visual communication designers to support the development of their own designs. They establish a brief for a client and apply design thinking through the design process. They identify and describe a client, two distinctly different needs of that client, and the purpose, target audience, context and constraints relevant to each need.

    Unit 4: Visual communication design development, evaluation and presentation

    The focus of this unit is on the development of design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated communication needs. Having completed their brief and generated ideas in Unit 3, students continue the design process by developing and refining concepts for each communication need stated in the brief. They utilise a range of digital and manual two- and three-dimensional methods, media and materials. They investigate how the application of design elements and design principles creates different communication messages and conveys ideas to the target audience. As students revisit stages to undertake further research or idea generation when developing and presenting their design solutions, they develop an understanding of the iterative nature of the design process. Ongoing reflection and evaluation of design solutions against the brief assists students with keeping their endeavours focused.

  • VET Music Industry Certificate III

    The Certificate III is a two year course, therefore students should have undertaken this subject prior to Year 12.

    Certificate III:

    The unit codes studied in the Certificate III in Music Industry (CUA30915) are as listed:

    • Develop technical skills in performance
    • Develop improvisation skills
    • Prepare for performances
    • Develop and maintain stage craft skills
    • Perform music as part of a group.
  • VET Sport and Recreation Certificate III

    The Certificate III is a two year course, therefore students should have undertaken this subject prior to Year 12.

    Certificate III

    The unit codes studied in the Certificate III in Sport and Recreation (SIS305513) are as listed:

    Year 1

    • Organise personal work priorities and development
    • Participate in workplace health and safety
    • Conduct non-instructional sport, fitness and recreation sessions
    • Respond to emergency situations
    • Provide first aid
    • Use social media tools for collaboration and engagement
      Provide quality service
    • Conduct sport, fitness or recreation events
    • Book athlete travel and accommodation

    Year 2

    • Participate in WHS hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control
    • Facilitate groups
    • Plan and conduct programs
    • Conduct sport coaching sessions with foundation level participants
    • Educate user groups.
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